Snowboard and Ski Gear

Snowboarding And Skiing Equipment News and Reviews

What is the difference between the various forms of skiing?

with 4 comments

Such as Nordic skiing, Ski Jumping, Cross Country Skiing, Telemark skiing, Alpine skiing, etc.? I’ve gained a large interest in skiing after watching a video of someone ski down a beautiful mountain on Colorado, and now I’m interested in not only going skiing, but learning more about it?

In skiing you have two distinct categories, Alpine and Nordic. Everything else is a sub-category.

Nordic Skiing encompasses "Cross-Country" and all of it’s various forms, ski-jumping, and telemark skiing. While all are very different they share one common factor…the ski is attached to the boot at the toe only and the heel is free. If you want to know more about these individual sports I suggest starting with Wikipedia and looking up the massive amount of info available there. Aside from ski-jumping, Nordic skiing is a type of skiing used for travel. True, racing and recreation have turned it into a sport, but essentially this type of skiing has its roots in viable forms of mountain and winter travel conditions. With nordic bindings you can easily move up and down mountains, hills, and fields.

Any type of skiing that involves binding that locks both the toe and the heel is Alpine. The sub-categories of Alpine Skiing are enormous. The traditional "downhill" skiing events such as Slalom Giant Slalom Super-G, and Downhill attract skiers who like speed and skilled turns. Freestyle skiing encompasses everything from Slopestyle tricks, to Aerials to Mogul Skiing, and the venerable Ski Ballet! Additionally, Alpine Touring and Monoskiing are Alpine sub-categories as well. For the most part, Alpine disciplines are recreational based. Alpine Touring being the exception since it actually evolved from Telemark skiing.

This is a great question, but way too lengthy to answer here. For more info, start here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skiing

Be Sociable, Share!

Written by Snowboard And Ski Guy

July 1st, 2010 at 8:35 pm

Posted in Skiing FAQ

4 Responses to 'What is the difference between the various forms of skiing?'

Subscribe to comments with RSS or TrackBack to 'What is the difference between the various forms of skiing?'.

  1. cross country skiing is like a race. alpine skiing is the normal or average skiing you see most people doing. ski jumping is literally skiing down a large ramp and doing jumps for distance.
    References :

    biggestfan14

    2 Jul 10 at 4:45 am

  2. well it has 2 main catergories and jumping comes under distance i think but as there are only a couple different ones its not a main catergorie. but the race and freestyle catergories. race : slalom,giant slalom, cross country, nordic skiing etc and freestyle : moguls (comes under race as well but has more freestyle as the key of it is to get as many points by tricks ), aerial, halfpipe, big air, qauter pipe and so much more. to cut it short the racing point is to get the fastest time and the freestyle is to get the most points from tricks and the others catergories are distance, target shooting ( the triatholon) and etc
    References :

    Reece Walton

    2 Jul 10 at 5:27 am

  3. In skiing you have two distinct categories, Alpine and Nordic. Everything else is a sub-category.

    Nordic Skiing encompasses "Cross-Country" and all of it’s various forms, ski-jumping, and telemark skiing. While all are very different they share one common factor…the ski is attached to the boot at the toe only and the heel is free. If you want to know more about these individual sports I suggest starting with Wikipedia and looking up the massive amount of info available there. Aside from ski-jumping, Nordic skiing is a type of skiing used for travel. True, racing and recreation have turned it into a sport, but essentially this type of skiing has its roots in viable forms of mountain and winter travel conditions. With nordic bindings you can easily move up and down mountains, hills, and fields.

    Any type of skiing that involves binding that locks both the toe and the heel is Alpine. The sub-categories of Alpine Skiing are enormous. The traditional "downhill" skiing events such as Slalom Giant Slalom Super-G, and Downhill attract skiers who like speed and skilled turns. Freestyle skiing encompasses everything from Slopestyle tricks, to Aerials to Mogul Skiing, and the venerable Ski Ballet! Additionally, Alpine Touring and Monoskiing are Alpine sub-categories as well. For the most part, Alpine disciplines are recreational based. Alpine Touring being the exception since it actually evolved from Telemark skiing.

    This is a great question, but way too lengthy to answer here. For more info, start here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skiing
    References :
    @Andy…Unfortunately I have to correct you. Telemark is a Nordic form. The heel is free, ergo, it is Nordic. The telemark turn is a nordic turn used in cross country skiing as well as "downhill" telemarking. The telemark landing style is used in Ski Jumping…also a Nordic discipline (ie. The Nordic Combined event.) Additionally, Alpine technique evolved from the Nordic technique. At one time, all downhillers used telemark turns, so it is impossible for Telemark to be a style of Alpine.

    But what do I know? I only sold, serviced, and mounted Nordic and Telemark skis for two years and have been teaching tele on the side for five years.

    Willie D

    2 Jul 10 at 6:07 am

  4. Nordic skiing and cross country skiing are the same thing, it involves using very thin skis and boots connected only at the toe. you can ski across flat snow, it is a great work out. Telemarking is a variation on alpine where the bindings are connected only at the toe, you turn by bending your knees and planting your pole. They are mainly used for powder skiing. Ski jumping involves using very long skis and a man made track. the track has guides that take you down all the way to the lip of the jump. In competition he who jumps the farthest wins. And alpine, well thats what you think of when you think of skiing, down hill
    References :

    Andy

    2 Jul 10 at 6:20 am

Leave a Reply